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Posts for tag: Gestational diabetes

By Associates in Women's Health
August 27, 2021
Category: Pregnancy Care
Gestational DiabetesEven if you’ve never been diagnosed with diabetes, some women can develop diabetes during pregnancy. This is known as gestational diabetes and is often diagnosed by the 24th week of pregnancy. Gestational diabetes means that your blood sugar levels are too high. If left untreated this can lead to serious complications for both you and your baby, so you must discuss your gestational diabetes with your OBGYN so that you and your doctor can create an effective game plan.
 
Why does gestational diabetes occur?

The pancreas is responsible for producing insulin, which helps your body store sugar from food to use for energy; however, when you are pregnant the placenta also produces hormones that can impact insulin levels and lead to insulin resistance. If your body doesn’t produce enough insulin, this can result in gestational diabetes.
 
What are the signs of gestational diabetes?

It is possible for a pregnant woman to have gestational diabetes and not even know it, which is why you should keep up with prenatal visits with your OBGYN so that they can perform the necessary testing to keep both you and your baby healthy throughout your pregnancy and delivery.
 
However, it is possible to develop symptoms (particularly if you have undiagnosed diabetes before getting pregnant). These symptoms include,
  • Blurry vision
  • Fatigue
  • Increased hunger and thirst
  • Urinating more often
Since these symptoms can also just be indicative of a healthy, normal pregnancy (aka: being hungrier than usual) these symptoms don’t necessarily mean that you have gestational diabetes. You must speak with your OBGYN about certain risk factors and keep up with your checkups so that gestational diabetes can be detected right away.
 
How is gestational diabetes treated?

Many women can improve their blood sugar levels through simple measures such as healthy eating, exercising regularly, managing stress, and monitoring their blood sugar levels. By controlling this issue now you can prevent gestational diabetes in the future, as well as the development of type 2 diabetes. Sometimes your doctor may also prescribe insulin medication to help control your blood sugar.
 
Your OBGYN’s goal is to provide you with proper care and treatment throughout your life, from general wellness checkups to post-natal and menopausal care. If you have concerns about gestational diabetes, or if you’ve been diagnosed with gestational diabetes, talk with your OBGYN about the best way to keep it under control.
By Associates in Women's Health
December 01, 2017
Category: Pregnancy Care

High-risk pregnancies occur when your health or that of your baby can be affected during the pregnancy or delivery. Are you concerned your pregnancy may be high-risk? Take a look at a few factors that can increase your risk.

Age

If you're under age 17 or over 35, your pregnancy will be considered high risk, due to the increased likelihood of complications.

Preeclampsia

Preeclampsia, also called toxemia, occurs when you develop high blood pressure and a high level of protein in your urine. The condition can be dangerous for both you and your baby and usually develops after the 20th week of pregnancy. It can cause swelling in the hands, legs, and feet.

Gestational diabetes

This form of diabetes develops around the 24th week of pregnancy and is usually detected during a routine screening. The problem occurs when your body can't use glucose efficiently. In most cases, you'll no longer have diabetes after your baby is born.

Multiple pregnancy

Complications, gestational diabetes, and premature labor are more likely if you're carrying more than one baby.

Fetal issues

Your pregnancy will be considered high-risk if there's a developmental or genetic problem with your baby, or if a heart, lung or kidney problem is spotted during an ultrasound,

Placenta previa

Placenta previa occurs when the placenta partially or completely covers the cervix. If you have the condition, you may experience severe bleeding during your pregnancy. Because severe bleeding can also occur during birth, you may need a Cesarean section, particularly if the placenta completely covers the cervix. Bed rest is usually recommended for women who have placenta previa.

Medical conditions

You or your baby may be more likely to experience complications if you have high blood pressure, cancer, epilepsy, asthma, diabetes, HIV or AIDS, lung disease, autoimmune disorders, kidney or heart problems, or sexually transmitted diseases.

Multiple miscarriages

Women who have had three or more miscarriages can benefit from more intense monitoring during pregnancy.

Most high-risk pregnancies have happy endings, thanks to the special care women receive during the pregnancies. If you have an issue that could raise your risk, it's important to talk to your ob/gyn about your concerns as soon as you become pregnant or notice a problem.



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