Treating Irregular Menstruation

By Associates in Women's Health
February 05, 2019
Category: Women's Health

Treating Irregular Periods

Irregular periods are common when you first start menstruating. It’s common for them to be early or late, but as you get older, your menstrual cycle should become more regular, with the average length of the cycle lasting 28 days.

You have chronic irregular periods if:

  • The length of your menstrual cycle keeps changing
  • Your periods are coming early or late
  • You experience severe abdominal pain and very heavy bleeding during your period

There are many causes of irregular periods, including:

  • Puberty, pregnancy, or menopause
  • Contraceptive measures including the pill or intrauterine device
  • Extreme weight fluctuations, excessive exercise, or stress
  • Medical conditions including thyroid issues, endometriosis, uterine fibroids, or polycystic ovary syndrome

You should see a doctor if:

  • Your periods are suddenly irregular and you are under age 45
  • Your periods are more frequent than 21 days
  • Your periods are less frequent than 35 days
  • Your periods last longer than 7 days
  • You have severe abdominal pain and heavy bleeding with your periods
  • You are trying to have a baby, but you have irregular periods

There are several ways to treat irregular menstruation. The first step is determining what is causing it. If it is due to a medical issue like thyroid problems, medication or treatment of the underlying condition is vital. Additional treatment measures include:

  • Losing weight, if irregular menstruation is due to being overweight
  • Hormonal therapies, including birth control to regulate menstruation
  • Surgical therapy, if irregular menstruation is due to uterine fibroids or other structural issue.

There is also a 5-year intrauterine device known as Mirena, which can lessen bleeding. It also works as a contraceptive. Your doctor can help you decide which treatment option is best for you.

Irregular menstruation may be self-limiting, but it may go on for months or years. It can affect your life, especially if you are trying to get pregnant. It can also be a sign of a serious underlying condition. It’s important to seek out your doctor to find the cause, protect your health, and give you peace-of-mind.

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